It’s Wednesday in the peaceful island we know and love so well where blood ivory may end up in Buddhist temples ????

Am not sure how many of you have read Asterix but if you have you will remember the opening line in each of Goscinny& Uderzo s beloved books was “Another day dawns in the peaceful little village we know and love so well”.

I feel like that sometimes when I see somewhere in my mind’s eye the sunlight filtering through the palm trees and lighting up the lawn at my parent’s home by the sea, the river coming to life in Bolgoda, the tank at Minneriya calm and quiet save for the splash of early fishermen who offered us a lift home back to our Rest House last year and yes, this year, the paddy fields of Kurunegala and the acres of vegetable gardens with guinea fowl and rooster, goat and chickens, dogs and cows beginning a new day is well… paradise-like and I know we have a legacy of nature unparalleled over there with some beautiful hearts and minds that I could never replace in my lifetime.

However, Sunela’s post on blood ivory  is also an issue facing Sri Lanka. Even though the slaughter was of African elephants Sunela raises the question that such practices are not only against Ahimsa but also would encourage similar atrocities in Sri Lanka. A buddhist country they say well I prefer to say a country blessed with many religions and amongst them the supreme influence of Buddhism. Surely, this tragedy needs the attention of the highest in the land and we shall await further writings on any possible steps or solutions provided by the State.

Sunela Jayawardene don’t give up. There are a few experts like you in Sri Lanka who can speak out so keep the heat on for a positive resolution.
Magazine-Cover_Blood-Ivory

“This illegal shipment is the result of the cruel slaughter of 179 African elephants. Ivory poachers shoot the adults and young animals in an elephant

herd, and hack off the tusks. The babies are left to starve. Soaked in the blood of elephants that died in agony, the tusks are known as blood ivory.

To place blood ivory for veneration in temples that extoll the greatest philosophy of ahimsa, is sacrilegious, and will taint the noble cause and name of Buddhism in Sri Lanka, especially because of the global attention that blood ivory has received.
A recent article in National Geographic Magazine [October 2012] highlighted the horror of blood ivory. As you know, the National Geographic Society has given Sri Lanka excellent reviews as one of the world’s top destinations, but the adverse publicity if this ivory is distributed to temples will surely tarnish this image.”