All posts by gaya

A Must-see: N.O.W an art exhibition by Sivasubramaniam Kajendran

 

Siva is an artist,  survivor, citizen and a human most extraordinary.  His work is a testimony to how the human mind with artistic expression can transcend the violence of war, the other myriad constraints and negotiations that await the unsuspecting human and the navigation of pain and moving beyond. 

Do share this post, and drop in at the theertha Red Dot Gallery from today the 6 March to 21st and say hello from Gaya if you do! Am gutted to have missed out and to be locked out of the island especially at times like this!

Siva is my friend and always will be. Since I shared his first solo exhibition Stranded in March 2016 on this website, five years ago, I decided that Siva’s new exhibition will be my attempt to revive this iSrilankan space where middle-of-the-roaders wrote their thoughts and we connected across the planet in a struggling post-war mindset. 

Somethings change in Sri Lanka but there are they who remain constant. And this has saved our souls in ways that we can only be thankful for. 

Siva’s story may also be found here as he told it to me five years ago

Sri Lankan–Africans from Puttalam: visiting my “long-lost relatives”!

MARYANNE KOODA

[Maryanne wrote this in her inimitable style many years ago. But the comments kept rolling in and I am thankful for saving this piece for anyone who is interested in the hidden histories of our people and their ways]

Along a narrow trail that wound a short distance from the Puttalam /Anuradhapura road, lay the quiet village we were searching for.  We reach Sirambiandiya after a four hour trip by bus from Colombo.  We are unsure of what type of reception we will get, as the research we had done on them, told of a people who were fed up of being treated like a circus freak show!

The knowledge of their existence has since been publicised by musical performances at the Barefoot Café,  so the novelty had worn off. Yet we were still interested in meeting them, despite the possibility that they may be wary of visitors. We took the chance and were delighted to find them open and friendly.

Continue reading Sri Lankan–Africans from Puttalam: visiting my “long-lost relatives”!

Five years ago: ‘Stranded’ an art exhibition (and so much more) by Sivasubramaniam Kajendran

Five years ago, Siva called me up and said ‘please can you do a post for my exhibition?’ That was this post on Stranded which he exhibited in Jaffna.  Today, am waiting for another call from Siva to create a post on his N.O.W exhibition which is at the Theertha Red Dot Gallery on 6 March 2021. It is incredible to think of how one phone call could have created an encounter. But we Sri Lankans have not snuffed out that ‘energy’ to ‘initiate’ ‘create’ and ‘encounter’ all by our own wee selves. Yes, from all over the world. We are here! 

Stranded 1STRANDED: by Sivasubramanium Kajendran

Première at  2.30 pm on 28th March at the Art Gallery, University of Fine Arts, Jaffna.

Exhibition dates: 28th March-1st April 2016.

I still hear Siva’s strong voice as he concluded our conversation a little while ago with the words ‘give my regards to your family.’ Bitterly ironic, given what Siva has left to call his own.

Continue reading Five years ago: ‘Stranded’ an art exhibition (and so much more) by Sivasubramaniam Kajendran

‘I can’t remember my sister’s face’ – the story behind ‘Stranded’ by Sivasubramaniam Kajendran

BY GAYA FERNANDO

Stories find you and not the other way around sometimes—Siva Kaja’s story just burst on me without warning. It was not a by-the-book introduction. He sent me a photo of his exhibition STRANDED on FB and I asked him to send me a write-up that I could share with my friends in Sri Lanka.

‘Call me and I will tell you the story behind my exhibition’, he said, and – little realizing that he would find it hard to convey the meaning in written English – I insisted that he write something first.
Continue reading ‘I can’t remember my sister’s face’ – the story behind ‘Stranded’ by Sivasubramaniam Kajendran

A Masters worth its Salt: Master of Development Practice, Peradeniya Uni

GAYA FERNANDO

Some people get into development work without a clue as to what it’s all about. They joined up to a corps of people who wanna make the world a better place. That’s fine.

Then there are professionals who slog away at commercial jobs and half-way take a break, unwind in the mountains or beaches of Sri Lanka and wonder if this is all there is to life. Then they apply with their corporate skills and experience for jobs in the non-profit sector. That’s great!

Some people are very career-minded and would like to start out with a degree in an area that will give them experience in working with communities and are interested in the concept of sustainable development.  That’s wonderful !

Oh yes, and what about the experienced employees in NGOs who think they are too ‘senior’ to come into a University classroom and take on a challenge sitting beside the young hopefuls twenty-something but are crazy about getting a Masters in the area of work they love?

Well, all of you are absolutely welcome !

Master of Development Practice (MDP) at Peradeniya

“Sri Lanka and its neighbours face compelling challenges as they move toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals in the context of pursuing a sustainable development agenda. These include threats from climate change, vulnerability to natural disasters, rapid urbanization, demographic change, persistent and substantial levels of poverty and malnutrition especially in lagging regions and among vulnerable groups. Addressing these complex issues requires professionals with many areas of core knowledge, practical skills and an interdisciplinary approach” MDP, Peradeniya University website

Why it is innovative and unique

There are some features of this MDP that make it an incredibly practical and workable challenge to those committed to development. They are not listed in order of importance.

FIRST, the MDP is open to those who may not have a University degree but instead may be able to meet the equivalent in terms of experience. We could give you a few courses you may need but the gates are not barred; they are open.

SECOND,  the MDP is conducted entirely on weekends so those who are working full-time as most of us do, can travel up to Peradeniya on the weekends when lectures are held.

THIRD, it’s just great that the MDP is inter-disciplinary, drawing on humanities, social sciences, management, law, health sciences, natural sciences and engineering, to name a few. And this inter-disciplinary thinking gets you good marks with UN and NGOs, non-profit sector as the work at hand demands this perspective rather than expertise in one discipline.

FOURTH, the MDP can place the students in ‘placements’ for their field work in unique locations and working with top-notch Development Orgs the range and scope of which cannot be rivalled by any other Masters in this field.

FIFTH, the faculty, the liaisons and connections with Columbia University and the global network makes this Masters a valuable experience and one that will give you the insight and professional knowledge to further your career and to expand your perspectives on Sustainable Development.

Applications for the following academic year 2016/17 are NOW OPEN  Dec-Feb. Please see the student resources page on the MDP website for details and for your easy reference here is the Applications Page.

Student Testimonials :

“when I found out about the new approach focusing more on field training and the inter-disciplinary course content itself, covering geography, biology, statistics and economics (which should be essentially included if the development practitioner is to design and implement projects that would benefit different aspects of life of the beneficiaries) it made more sense and yes, I thought this is it!”  Natasha Yatawara. Read her story from Gambia in this interview.

The Master of Development Practice is a programme in 17 countries.  The Peradeniya University is one of the five Asian universities to be included in the global MDP network. It’s a Masters programme worth its salt. iSrilankan is proud to promote its benefits to the Sri Lankan local and international student community.

Like the MDP Facebook Page  right away and you can keep up with the news and updates easily.

The images of Peradeniya University above and the collage below are credited to Kalpa Rajapaksha

A space to remember

GAYA FERNANDO

Far away from Sri Lanka I gaze at the swallows with underbellies golden-glazed in the evening sun dip and swirl in abandon. I watch a white giant magnolia unfold.

Screen shot 2013-06-04 at 11.23.58 PMAnd then I think of all that is grief, all that is not now anymore but has gone before and wonder how in a hundred years someone will say what were they doing, thinking saying, all of them around the world who supposedly had lost something to war but had no human courage, largehearted unity and creativity to imagine, create and embrace a memorial space. Continue reading A space to remember

A mother’s tribute to her community !

 

Natalie Soysa: A Mother’s tribute to her CMB Community from iSrilankan on Vimeo

 

NATALIE SOYSA

 

I’ve often complained about everybody knowing everybody’s business in too-small Colombo.
Today, I’m ready to eat my words.
I am bringing up my son in what you would call a single-parent household.
But there’s never really been just a single parent in my home.
I thought the benefit of being a photographer meant that my son’s every moment would be frozen in time.
Juggling a camera and baby was not as as easy as it looked, but I still have so many pictures of him!
And its only because he’s always in someone’s arms!
So many different arms have come to spend time with him, play with him, dance with him, change him, bathe him and feed him.
My son doesn’t have a single parent, he has a village.
Its been a wonderful reminder that humans are essentially pack animals and not isolated family units.
My son is being community raised and he’s going to be all the better for it.
This is a tribute to all the arms that have held my son close, reminding him that he is loved.
This is a tribute to my community.

 

Words & Photographs – Natalie Soysa

 

Bio

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Natalie Soysa in her own words : I am a freelance photographer and journalist based in Sri Lanka who quit a 13 year career in advertising in 2010 to pick up a camera and head off on what most would call a fool’s journey.

After a few photography & photojournalism projects that feature the post-war explosion of arts & culture in the country, this June, I will be taking over as new Manager-Arts at the British Council.

Most importantly – I’m an incurable Star Wars geek.

Visit Natalie’s about me page for more info.

 

 

 

Photo by Indu Bandara

 

 

 

Aiyo, Tissa !!

PR_Challenge Patriarchy_comrades

 

GAYA FERNANDO

There are millions of people who write stuff and say stuff. People shudder, wince and move on. Today,  it’s the speech that moves on in tweet and share, snowballing it’s way over the social media. However, somewhere it first appeared in Print; that’s real bad. Print counted for something once,  was seriously reviewed, edited material at some point.

Tissa Karaliyadda sat up and chirped at me over my first cuppa. “A man should always be the Chairperson.” This is a much-tweeted opinion of  the Minister of Child Development and Women’s Affairs. He has been shared by Frances Harrison as well as my close friends. Aaarrrgh! What was the man thinking ???

Continue reading Aiyo, Tissa !!

Ravi has one beautiful eye!

GAYA FERNANDO

 

Journeys start with chance encounters and deliberate action; both are needed.  Nothing just happens and wherever there are dire survival needs there is also an energy to make like-minded people set out on a journey together.

 

 How I met the little children

 

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I met Tharindu Amunugama at a rather noisy festive location in Colombo in August 2011. It didn’t take long to find out his inspiration in life: the Children’s project he believed in which his Chairman Mano Nanayakkara had launched titled Glorious Jaffna. I had seen the book.   Curious, I watched the Youtube vid of the launch and there was something about the ‘Wheel-Chairman’ and his commitment that was riveting. Had I not heard this name before? Maybe as a young lawyer at Paul Ratnayeke’s I may have, but I didn’t ask anyone about it and pledged to support two kids in the project in the name of my own two kids in 2012.

When Trehan sent me the pictures of the kids I chose the little boy cos he had one eye and the little girl cos there was an angry expression on her face as though she did not realise that a smile would help her case. Nor care.

Continue reading Ravi has one beautiful eye!

A Tale of Two Women and the birth of Paartheepan

GAYA FERNANDO

Rizana Nafeek left the country forging her age on a passport and found herself in hot water with the laws of the foreign host nation. She was denied her life in the discretion given to the tribal family negotiation process in Saudi Arabia and was sentenced to a terrible death. Ranjini left the country as a refugee post-war and found herself in a legal ‘black hole’ in Australia regarding ‘significant and continuing security threats to Australia. She failed the security test of which no details are released and was thrown into indefinite detention with no reasons given and no appeal according to the processes of national security in Australia. She may not lose her life immediately though there is a significant and continuing risk that she will lose her mind as others have done and are receiving psychiatric treatment as the length of indefinite detention takes its toll on the human mind.

Both the girl Rizani and the young woman Ranjini did not make this journey alone nor are they very cognisant of the procedures to which they were submitted. They left the country assisted by a network of agents who profit from assisting those who wish to leave the country to do that for a hefty fee.

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Admittedly one young woman accidentally may have caused the death of a child and the other may have been employed by a terrorist organisation during a war in the country she left. What matters now is how Host State processes mete out justice on their terms to people who are in the grey area of the law and to whom a discretion may apply given the individual circumstances of both women.  Yet what is seen is that the only criteria applied is how these actions affect the host nation. Both Rizana and Ranjini are just migrants/refugee applicants who do not belong there.

On January 9th we lost Rizana and on January 15th was born a son, Paartheepan, to Ranjini, who is still in indefinite detention. This is what may change the tide in the case of the second young woman.

Paartheepan means light to the world. Paartheepan’s father is a Permanent Resident of Australia, Ganesh and so, ‘Paari’ is an Australian citizen and will be able to leave the detention centre without his mother. However, for the present, strategically as well as naturally it will be best to leave the little baby with his mother for his well-being and hers as well as to attract more outrage and attention to her plight which is hardly in line with 2012 human rights norms relating to limits in detention, the right to appeal and the right to know the charges against you. Paari has two brothers at the Villawood detention centre who go to school but come back to the centre and are not free to leave.

I have followed to some extent the campaigns for Rizana and Ranjini from the social media callouts and other newspaper reports. It has been alleged that the delegations to plead on behalf of Rizana may have worked against her interest with their premature indications of a settlement, possibly hardening the resolve of the tribal family negotiators to withhold the pardon in this case. I have no informed opinion on this. However, if this were the case, there is a lesson to be learnt; many may be. It is therefore with a certain anxiety that I view the vociferous, emotional twittering of campaigners who call on even Barack Obama to press for the release of Ranjini. Paartheepan, bless him has his own hashtag #paari, another called #bornfree and the campaign grows in animosity towards ASIO, Chris Bowen and others involved as State Officials in this case.

RA51712While it is very commendable and humanly moving to see the campaign for Ranjini, it is not uncommon for State Authorities to tighten their resolve to continue their process despite the clamour of activists and to be seen as not giving into pressure from rights groups. This is evident in many such situations in Europe, USA, UK and well, pretty much anywhere including Sri Lanka.

Therefore it is hoped that little Paari and his mum will not be hindered by this social clamour and that the authorities determining their case will be given that prudent window in which to reach a dignified verdict on their own. Sometimes activism is its own enemy and the campaigners get carried away by tweet overload. Congratulating their efforts, it is hoped that political realism will allow this life-changing decision to be carried out by the powers that be as soon as possible.

This is the announcement on the website Letters for Ranjini on his birthday Jan 15th.

We are blessed with a boy, Paartheepan (Paari).

4.075kg on 15-01-2013 Tuesday at 8:23PM.

Mum and baby are fine.

Regards, Ranjini and family.

One little note of relief is that little Paari weighed over 4kgs at birth and he is in good health. Pardons and amnesties are in place for a reason as is the review of judicial process over other state institutions. Let us hope that Paari will hasten the processes that will determine if Ranjani is or is not a continuing security threat and will signal a new life for the family in Australia if all goes well.

Paartheepan, Ayubowan !!